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RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE
Evil Empire

(2 recensioni dei clienti)

12.90

CD NEW AND SEALED

Evil Empire is the second studio album by the American musical group Rage Against the Machine, released in 1996. Evil Empire comes out four years after their previous debut album, Rage Against the Machine, and keeps the anger and contempt towards the machine intact. capitalist system of the United States. Singer Zack de la Rocha expresses his disappointment in a way that places himself halfway between rapper Chuck D and a street preacher. The libertarian slogans shouted by Zack rise above the heavy musical assault of the other three members of the band. The band didn’t have much time to rehearse and compose new pieces after 1993, but Evil Empire experimented with new guitar (Morello) and bass (Commerford) distortions. Guitarist Tom Morello demonstrates an impressive variety of sounds and sound effects. The singles People of the Sun and Bulls on Parade were extracted from the album, thanks to which the album managed to place itself at the top of the Billboard charts.

The title of the album takes up the expression empire of evil used by Ronald Reagan, at the time he was president of the United States, to indicate the Soviet Union.

Descrizione

Legendary Album from Rage Against the Machine

Tracklist:

PEOPLE OF THE SUN
BULLS ON PARADE
VIETNOW
REVOLVER
SNAKECHARMER
TIRE ME
DOWN RODEO
WITHOUT A FACE
WIND BELOW
ROLL RIGHT
YEAR OF THA BOOMERANG

Label: Epic Records

Format: Cd Jewel Box

Band website: https://www.ratm.com/

Band Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RATM

2 recensioni per RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE
Evil Empire

  1. From Rollingstone.com: Heavy metal has never been much of a forum for political discourse. Not that all razor-edged rockers are lunkheads, but many are just too narcissistic to see beyond their own narrow world Either they’re obsessed with decadence and debauchery or consumed by misery and hatred. Neither situation leaves much room for intelligent discussion of the issues of the day.

    Rage Against the Machine hope to change that with their inflammatory blend of roaring guitars, barked raps and political activism. Their lyrics lambaste government corruption, media manipulation, big business, complacency and ambivalence, and the band members practice what they preach. Since the release of their debut album in 1992, they’ve walked onstage naked at Lollapalooza with electric tape over their mouths to protest music censorship, played a benefit show for the death-row inmate Mumia Abu-Jamal and spoken out against the imprisonment of the American Indian Movement leader Leonard Peltier.

    Rage’s first album adhered a bit too closely to the band’s influences, invoking the force of Black Sabbath, the swaggering stomp of Led Zeppelin and the confrontational rap style of Public Enemy. The lyrics lashed out against a range of domestic problems, including police brutality, the educational system and innercity violence. But while the album was ambitious, it failed to meet its lofty goals. Disaffected teens rallied behind the cries of “Fuck you/I won’t do what you told me,” from “Killing in the Name,” but they seemed to view Rage’s appeal as an excuse to skip school and take drugs. That was four years ago, and since that time, Rage Against the Machine have honed their marksmanship and fine-tuned their agenda. If the band’s first album was a call to arms, Evil Empire is a declaration of war, only this time, many of the group’s diatribes are aimed at foreign soil. Vocalist and lyricist Zack De La Rocha has become involved with the continuing struggle of the Zapatistas, a group of Mexican farmers seeking emancipation from the ruling class, and at least three songs on Evil Empire address the issue. On “Without a Face,” which features tornado guitar gusts that build and dip over a sparse funk beat, De La Rocha outlines the dilemma: “Maize was all we needed to sustain/Now her golden skin burns insecticide rain/Ya down with DDT, yeah, you know me/Raped for the grapes, profit for the bourgeois.”

    Elsewhere, the band focuses its sights on the U.S. military (“Bulls on Parade”), the American dream (“Tire Me”) and right-wing talk shows (“Vietnow”). De La Rocha has always been radical in his beliefs, but on Evil Empire, he comes off like a hybrid of the Terminator and Robin Hood, on a mission to annihilate the power elite and redistribute the wealth.

    On a sonic level the band still anchors its sound in the music of Led Zeppelin and Red Hot Chili Peppers, but its horizons have widened, and it now incorporates influences like Fugazi and Helmet. Rage also have acquired a greater understanding of hip-hop and funk and have injected the techniques of artists such as Dr. Dre, Cypress Hill, and Sly and the Family Stone into their turbocharged rhythms. As a result, there’s a greater synergy between the music and the message.

    Making better use of dynamics, guitarist Tom Morello coaxes a startling array of sounds from his strings and effect pedals. At various moments the guitars resemble power drills, machine guns and fax machines. “Bulls on Parade” incorporates funky wah-wah guitar strums and an intricate record-scratching solo into a blasting rhythm. “Wind Below” is driven by a riff that recalls a slowed-down version of Zeppelin’s “Black Dog,” and “Revolver” starts with underwater guitar echoes that sound like “EXP,” by Jimi Hendrix, before shifting into a murky, psychedelic section similar to Zeppelin’s “No Quarter” and ending with a punk riff reminiscent of Beck’s “Mutherfuker.That was four years ago, and since that time, Rage Against the Machine have honed their marksmanship and fine-tuned their agenda. If the band’s first album was a call to arms, Evil Empire is a declaration of war, only this time, many of the group’s diatribes are aimed at foreign soil. Vocalist and lyricist Zack De La Rocha has become involved with the continuing struggle of the Zapatistas, a group of Mexican farmers seeking emancipation from the ruling class, and at least three songs on Evil Empire address the issue. On “Without a Face,” which features tornado guitar gusts that build and dip over a sparse funk beat, De La Rocha outlines the dilemma: “Maize was all we needed to sustain/Now her golden skin burns insecticide rain/Ya down with DDT, yeah, you know me/Raped for the grapes, profit for the bourgeois.”

    Elsewhere, the band focuses its sights on the U.S. military (“Bulls on Parade”), the American dream (“Tire Me”) and right-wing talk shows (“Vietnow”). De La Rocha has always been radical in his beliefs, but on Evil Empire, he comes off like a hybrid of the Terminator and Robin Hood, on a mission to annihilate the power elite and redistribute the wealth.

    On a sonic level the band still anchors its sound in the music of Led Zeppelin and Red Hot Chili Peppers, but its horizons have widened, and it now incorporates influences like Fugazi and Helmet. Rage also have acquired a greater understanding of hip-hop and funk and have injected the techniques of artists such as Dr. Dre, Cypress Hill, and Sly and the Family Stone into their turbocharged rhythms. As a result, there’s a greater synergy between the music and the message.

    Making better use of dynamics, guitarist Tom Morello coaxes a startling array of sounds from his strings and effect pedals. At various moments the guitars resemble power drills, machine guns and fax machines. “Bulls on Parade” incorporates funky wah-wah guitar strums and an intricate record-scratching solo into a blasting rhythm. “Wind Below” is driven by a riff that recalls a slowed-down version of Zeppelin’s “Black Dog,” and “Revolver” starts with underwater guitar echoes that sound like “EXP,” by Jimi Hendrix, before shifting into a murky, psychedelic section similar to Zeppelin’s “No Quarter” and ending with a punk riff reminiscent of Beck’s “Mutherfuker.

  2. From Metalizzed: Cambia -leggermente- la forma, ma non il contenuto.
    Forti dei consensi ottenuti col fortunatissimo disco d’esordio, i Rage Against The Machine stupiscono ancora con la loro seconda uscita, Evil Empire: l’album infatti è un azzardo in piena regola, ci si aspettavano bordate esplosive e schitarrate furenti ed invece la band se ne esce con un qualcosa più rap-oriented che non metal in senso stretto. Si potrebbe dire che in questo secondo album la durezza della musica si piega a quella dei testi, lasciando a questi ultimi il ruolo centrale e rimanendo piuttosto “defilata” rispetto al predecessore: una novità che poteva rivelarsi un’arma a doppio taglio esponendo la band a qualche rischio. E difatti non tutti furono entusiasti del risultato, nonostante il successo immediato.

    La produzione venne affidata al veterano Brendan O’Brien (una sicurezza), mentre le registrazioni si svolsero tra Hollywood e Melbourne, in Australia.
    Il titolo è una citazione del 40° presidente degli Stati Uniti d’America Ronald Reagan, che con l’appellativo di Impero del Male definì -in un discorso tenuto nel marzo del 1983- l’ex Unione Sovietica (si era ancora nel periodo della cosiddetta Guerra Fredda e tra le due superpotenze non correva affatto buon sangue), mentre la copertina è la rielaborazione di un’opera dell’artista americano Mel Ramos. La rabbia è quella di sempre ma si sceglie di estrinsecarla più con le parole che non con la durezza delle note; Zack de la Rocha si scatena, infarcendo di accuse al vetriolo i brani del disco, denunciando temi quali la corruzione, la violenza domestica (Revolver) lo sfruttamento dei popoli più deboli (come nella filo-Zapatista People of the Sun), o ancora il capitalismo e tutti i nefasti effetti che ne derivano. Le differenze si sentono fin dalla prima nota, velate ma abbastanza evidenti: la prima song è un pezzo breve molto più rap rispetto a quelli contenuti nell’album d’esordio e la cosa non rimarrà un episodio isolato, anzi. In Bulls on Parade -che sarà estratta come singolo insieme a People of the Sun- si accusa il governo di guerrafondismo, essendo spinto dalle industrie belliche ad intervenire con azioni militari in modo che queste possano trarne benefici economici a discapito delle popolazioni coinvolte:

    Weapons not food, not homes, not shoes
    Not need, just feed the war cannibal animal
    I walk the corner to the rubble that used to be a library
    Line up to the mind cemetary, now
    What we don’t know keeps the contracts alive an movin’
    They don’t gotta burn tha books they just remove ‘em
    While arms warehouses fill as quick as the cells
    Rally round tha family, pocket full of shells

    Morello qui è ancora più sperimentatore del solito, scratcha con la sua sei corde (la stessa cosa in Bulls on Parade e Down Rodeo) e gli effetti più strani ed elaborati si sprecano: si ascolti ad esempio Without a Face; di contro i riff sono meno vari e il sound sembra essere piuttosto ripetitivo, si potrebbe dire ossessivo, onde ottenere l’effetto di martellare sulle parole quasi come queste fossero chiodi da conficcare nel cervello dell’ascoltatore, di cui l’arrabbiatissimo de la Rocha è fornito più che un negozio di ferramenta. Maggior attenzione ai testi, quindi, in parte a discapito dei rabbiosi slap di Commerford (qui accreditato come Tim Bob) e delle potenti bordate alla batteria di Brad Wilk, autore di una prestazione più “ordinaria” e di accompagnamento rispetto all’esplosiva prova data sul primo lavoro del combo californiano.
    È sicuramente l’album più “difficile” dei Rage Against The Machine e proprio per la sua particolarità c’è chi lo ritiene il migliore, ma è abbastanza palese che in una visione d’insieme Evil Empire risulta meno incisivo e “importante” della bomba atomica Rage Against the Machine: siamo comunque di fronte a un gran disco, ma la band cercherà in futuro di tornare a un sound di “più facile presa”.

    Chi è avvezzo a sonorità propriamente rap lo adorerà, agli altri è consigliato l’ascolto dopo aver dato la precedenza allo storico primo album del gruppo.

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